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Cookware Materials Guide

Stainless Steel Cookware

Good for: Searing, sautéing, braising, and making sauces. Your best choice for processing food for canning purposes.

Uses: Stove, oven, broiler.

PROS:

  • Nonreactive with alkaline or acidic foods
  • Durable: Highly resistant to rust, corrosion, and scratching or denting
  • Inexpensive for basic models
  • Dishwasher-safe
  • Induction capable

CONS:

  • Is not a non-stick surface, using oil is necessary
  • May by difficult to clean
  • Poor heat distribution
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Non-stick Cookware

Good for: Frying, Searing, Sautéing

Uses: Stovetop

HARD ANODIZED ALUMINUM
Anodization subjects the surface of aluminum pots and pans to a process that builds up the metal's natural coating of oxide. This yields a hard, nonreactive substance that forms a tough coating. While anodized aluminum does take longer to heat up than other materials, it's an excellent heat conductor (superior to stainless steel), scratch-resistant, and lightweight yet very strong.

PROS:

  • Excellent heat retention
  • Non-Reactive
  • Durable
  • Scratch-Resistant
  • Non-Stick

CONS:

  • Heavy
  • Expensive
  • Hand wash
  • Takes longer to heat

SHOP ALL HARD ANODIZED ALUMINUM COOKWARE

 

 

COATED ALUMINUM
A coating is applied to the surface of aluminum cookware to keep food from sticking to the pan. These non-stick pans offer cooks the ablilty to prepare foods without added fats while maintaining the heat-conduction properties of aluminum pans.

PROS:

  • Lightweight
  • Affordable
  • Excellent heat conductivity

CONS:

  • Soft metal can warp in high heat
  • Not as durable
  • Non-stick coating scratches easily
  • Not diswasher safe

SHOP ALL NON-STICK COATED COOKWARE

 

 

CERAMIC NON-STICK
Ceramic-coated cookware is a relatively new technology that is gaining in popularity in the world of healthy cooking. A ceramic layer is bonded to aluminium cookware to deliver a non-stick cooking surface.

PROS:

  • PTFE/PFOA Free
  • Even heat distribution
  • Available in a variety of colors
  • Easy-to-clean, Non-Stick Surface

CONS:

  • Hand wash only
  • Cannot withstand high heat
  • Non-stick coating scratches easily
  • Ceramic coating can chip

SHOP ALL CERAMIC NON-STICK COOKWARE

 

 

Cast Iron Cookware

SEASONED CAST IRON

Good for: Searing, Stove-to-Oven Recipes, Baking, Roasting, Frying.

Uses: Stovetop, Oven, Broiler, Grill, Direct Fire

PROS:

  • Durable
  • Inexpensive
  • Excellent heat conductivity and retention
  • Cooks food evenly
  • Non-Stick (when seasoned)

CONS:

  • Reacts to acidic foods
  • Heavy
  • Takes longer to heat up
  • Must be seasoned

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ENAMELED CAST IRON

Good for: Stews and Chili, Braising, Baking

Uses: Stovetop, Oven, Serving

PROS:

  • Durable
  • Non-reactive coating allows for long, slow cooking of acidic
    and alkaline foods
  • Excellent heat conductivity and retention
  • Comes in a Variety of Colors
  • Does not require seasoning

CONS:

  • Enamel can chip
  • Food can scorch easily
  • More expensive than traditional cast iron

SHOP ALL ENAMELED CAST IRON COOKWARE

 

 

Carbon Steel Cookware

CARBON STEEL

Good for: Stir-frying, Searing, Sauteing

Uses: Stovetop, Oven, Broiler, Grill, Open Fire

Known for its quick heating and strength, carbon steel is a durable, reliable cookware option that is commonly used to make woks and crepe pans. This material is particularly good for high-heat cooking like frying. Similar to cast iron, this material requires seasoning, especially upon first use.

PROS:

  • Quick-heating
  • Durable
  • Withstands high heat
  • Lightweight
  • Non-Stick (when seasoned)

CONS:

  • Requires seasoning
  • Reacts to acidic foods
  • Reacts to acidic foods

SHOP ALL CARBON STEEL COOKWARE